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Financial Economics for Insurance and Superannuation - ACTL3004
 Science students

   
   
   
 
Campus: Kensington Campus
 
 
Career: Undergraduate
 
 
Units of Credit: 6
 
 
EFTSL: 0.12500 (more info)
 
 
Indicative Contact Hours per Week: 4
 
 
Enrolment Requirements:
 
 
Prerequisite: ACTL2001 and ACTL2003
 
 
CSS Contribution Charge:Band 3 (more info)
 
   
 
Further Information: See Class Timetable
 
  

Description

The aim of this course is to introduce the mathematical and economic models of financial economics and highlight their application to asset-liability management for insurance, superannuation and funds management. Topics covered include; risk and utility; risk measures; mean variance models; factor models; asset liability models using portfolio selection models; equilibrium and arbitrage-free valuation; valuation of derivatives; term structure models; actuarial stochastic investment models and their application. The topics will be illustrated with applications to the valuation and risk management of insurance and superannuation contracts especially those with embedded options and financial guarantees.

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© The University of New South Wales (CRICOS Provider No.: 00098G), 2004-2011. The information contained in this Handbook is indicative only. While every effort is made to keep this information up-to-date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary arrangements, programs and courses at any time without notice and at its discretion. While the University will try to avoid or minimise any inconvenience, changes may also be made to programs, courses and staff after enrolment. The University may also set limits on the number of students in a course.