The University of New South Wales

go to UNSW home page

Handbook Home

Table of Contents
List divider List divider

Use this search only if you have an exact code for a Program, Plan, or Course, e.g. 3400, ACCTA13502, ACCT1501 or ACCT*.
Use the main search box (Search the UNSW Handbook) if you do not have an exact code and want to use a keyword instead.

PRINT THIS PAGE
Modern Asian Histories - ARTS3273
 LibraryLawn.jpg

   
   
   
 
Campus: Kensington Campus
 
 
Career: Undergraduate
 
 
Units of Credit: 6
 
 
EFTSL: 0.12500 (more info)
 
 
Indicative Contact Hours per Week: 3
 
 
Enrolment Requirements:
 
 
Prerequisite: Enrolment in a History major or minor and the completion of 72 uoc overall including 12 uoc at Level 2 in a History major or minor
 
 
CSS Contribution Charge:Band 1 (more info)
 
   
 
Further Information: See Class Timetable
 
  

Description



This is a shelf course. A shelf course comprises a number of modules related to this broad area of study. Each module is a separate semester of study in this area and is offered in rotation. You can study TWO modules but you cannot study the same module twice.


Subject Area: History

Module: "Modern Southeast Asia: 1950-2010"
This course has two goals: understanding the modern histories of Australia's immediate Asian neighbours; and analysing how histories are conceptualised, written and controlled, that is, how our knowledge is shaped by processes of selection and omission, perspective and censorship. Sources include academic and populist histories, documentaries, film, fiction and memoirs. Individual research projects will allow students to study in depth the Southeast Asian country of most interest to them or a theme for comparative analysis of two or more states. Topics include the big issues Southeast Asians grapple with today, such as reappraisal of colonial past, Asian versus Western modernity, state religion versus pluralism of belief, integration versus assimilation of minorities, population planning, and violence in public life.

Module: "The Rise of Modern China, 1842-2011" (Semester 2, 2011)
This course has two goals: understanding the modern history of Australia's largest trading partner; and analysing how histories are conceptualised, written and controlled, that is, how our knowledge is shaped by processes of selection and omission, perspective and censorship. Partuclar emphasis will be placed on how historic narratives of events such as the Tiananmen riots (1989) are formed in either country.

Sources include academic and populist histories, documentaries, film, fiction and memoirs. Individual research projects will allow students to study in depth a theme of most interest to them -- ranging from poetry to warfare. Topics include the big issues China grapples with today, such as reappraisal of the semi-colonial heritage of all-important urban hubs such as Shanghai, Chinese versus Western modernity, state religion versus pluralism of belief, integration versus assimilation of minorities, population planning, and violence in public life.

URL for this page:

© The University of New South Wales (CRICOS Provider No.: 00098G), 2004-2011. The information contained in this Handbook is indicative only. While every effort is made to keep this information up-to-date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary arrangements, programs and courses at any time without notice and at its discretion. While the University will try to avoid or minimise any inconvenience, changes may also be made to programs, courses and staff after enrolment. The University may also set limits on the number of students in a course.