Academic Item Menu

Overview

Decision-making by consumers, producers, and governments lies at the heart of economic analyses. The first half of this intermediate course in microeconomic theory is devoted to the study of rational decision-making and the modelling of associated market behaviour. We then study how individual economic decisions interact in markets with varying degrees of competition, paying substantial attention to the comparative welfare outcomes produced by different market forms. Additional topics include game theory and its applications, uncertainty and asymmetric information. There is substantial emphasis on the use of analytical and mathematical tools. These tools and the subject material underpin much of the current research in microeconomics.

Study Level

Undergraduate

Offering Terms

Summer Term, Term 1, Term 2

Campus

Kensington

Indicative contact hours

4.5

Conditions for Enrolment

Prerequisite: ECON1101 and (ECON1202, MATH1031, MATH1131, MATH1141 or MATH1151)

Course Outline

To access course outline, please visit:

Fees

Pre-2019 Handbook Editions

Access past handbook editions (2018 and prior)

Helpful utilities like sharing or printing this page
Share Link via Email
Download PDF